COVID 19 UPDATE: Preventative/wellness visits are now being scheduled. Only one person can accompany the patient to our Waxahachie office. At the Mansfield office only, the patient is allowed unless first pregnancy visit. We are requiring all patients and person accompanying them to wear a mask. At this time children are not allowed in the office. If any COVID 19 symptoms such as fever, cough, shortness of breath, loss of sense of smell or taste, sore throat, headache, vomiting, or diarrhea please call the office to reschedule your appointment. If you have been exposed to someone who tested positive or pending test results, please call to reschedule your appointment. We are continuing to take all precautions and sanitizing frequently throughout the day.
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Coronavirus Disease 2019

Posted on Wednesday, March 25th, 2020 at 5:01 am    

Pregnant Women

What is the risk to pregnant women of getting COVID-19? Is it easier for pregnant women to become ill with the disease? If they become infected, will they be more sick than other people?

We do not currently know if pregnant women have a greater chance of getting sick from COVID-19 than the general public nor whether they are more likely to have serious illness as a result. Pregnant women experience changes in their bodies that may increase their risk of some infections. With viruses from the same family as COVID-19, and other viral respiratory infections, such as influenza, women have had a higher risk of developing severe illness. It is always important for pregnant women to protect themselves from illnesses.

How can pregnant women protect themselves from getting COVID-19?

Pregnant women should do the same things as the general public to avoid infection. You can help stop the spread of COVID-19 by taking these actions:

  • Cover your cough (using your elbow is a good technique)
  • Avoid people who are sick
  • Clean your hands often using soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer

You can find additional information on preventing COVID-19 disease at CDC’s (Prevention for 2019 Novel Coronavirus).

Can COVID-19 cause problems for a pregnancy?

We do not know at this time if COVID-19 would cause problems during pregnancy or affect the health of the baby after birth.

During Pregnancy or Delivery

Can COVID-19 be passed from a pregnant woman to the fetus or newborn?

We still do not know if a pregnant woman with COVID-19 can pass the virus that causes COVID-19 to her fetus or baby during pregnancy or delivery. No infants born to mothers with COVID-19 have tested positive for the COVID-19 virus. In these cases, which are a small number, the virus was not found in samples of amniotic fluid or breastmilk.

Infants

If a pregnant woman has COVID-19 during pregnancy, will it hurt the baby?

We do not know at this time what if any risk is posed to infants of a pregnant woman who has COVID-19. There have been a small number of reported problems with pregnancy or delivery (e.g. preterm birth) in babies born to mothers who tested positive for COVID-19 during their pregnancy. However, it is not clear that these outcomes were related to maternal infection.

Breastfeeding

Interim Guidance on Breastfeeding for a Mother Confirmed or Under Investigation For COVID-19

This interim guidance is intended for women who are confirmed to have COVID-19 or are persons-under-investigation (PUI) for COVID-19 and are currently breastfeeding. This interim guidance is based on what is currently known about COVID-19 and the transmission of other viral respiratory infections. CDC will update this interim guidance as needed as additional information becomes available. For breastfeeding guidance in the immediate postpartum setting, refer to Interim Considerations for Infection Prevention and Control of 2019 Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Inpatient Obstetric Healthcare Settings.

Transmission of COVID-19 through breast milk

Much is unknown about how COVID-19 is spread. Person-to-person spread is thought to occur mainly via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, similar to how influenza (flu) and other respiratory pathogens spread. In limited studies on women with COVID-19 and another coronavirus infection, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV), the virus has not been detected in breast milk; however we do not know whether mothers with COVID-19 can transmit the virus via breast milk.

CDC breastfeeding guidance for other infectious illnesses

Breast milk provides protection against many illnesses. There are rare exceptions when breastfeeding or  feeding expressed breast milk is not recommended. CDC has no specific guidance for breastfeeding during infection with similar viruses like SARS-CoV or Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV).

Outside of the immediate postpartum setting, CDC recommends that a mother with flu continue breastfeeding or feeding expressed breast milk to her infant while taking precautions to avoid spreading the virus to her infant.

Guidance on breastfeeding for mothers with confirmed COVID-19 or under investigation for COVID-19

Breast milk is the best source of nutrition for most infants. However, much is unknown about COVID-19. Whether and how to start or continue breastfeeding should be determined by the mother in coordination with her family and healthcare providers.  A mother with confirmed COVID-19 or who is a symptomatic PUI should take all possible precautions to avoid spreading the virus to her infant, including washing her hands before touching the infant and wearing a face mask, if possible, while feeding at the breast.  If expressing breast milk with a manual or electric breast pump, the mother should wash her hands before touching any pump or bottle parts and follow recommendations for proper pump cleaning after each use. If possible, consider having someone who is well feed the expressed breast milk to the infant.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/pregnancy-breastfeeding.html


Medical Apps

Posted on Tuesday, November 10th, 2015 at 3:20 pm    

Smart phones are an inescapable part of modern life. They are convenient and increase efficiency in many areas. Here are some apps that we here at Women’s Healthcare Specialists of North Texas may help improve your health and quality of life.*

My Pregnancy Today App and Contraction Timer
iOS | Android

My Pregnancy Today

Period Tracker
iOS | Android

Period Tracker

Pill Reminder by Drugs.com
iOS | Android

Pill Reminder

Red Cross First Aid App
iOS | Android

Red Cross First Aid App

Omvana Meditation App
iOS | Android

Omvana Meditation App

MyFitnessPal – Calorie and Fitness Tracker App
iOS | Android

MyFitnessPal

* Medical health and lifestyle apps are no substitute for personalized medical advice. If you have medical questions or concerns, please contact your healthcare provider.


What is the Zika virus?

Posted on Saturday, October 10th, 2015 at 5:59 pm    

What is the Zika virus?

  • Zika virus is transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. Aedes mosquitoes are aggressive daytime biters and feed both indoors and outdoors. They can also bite at night.
  • Only one in five people who are infected with the virus will show any symptoms. Symptoms are usually mild and include mild fever, rash, muscle and joint pain.

Why should I be concerned?

  • Zika virus can be transmitted from a pregnant mother to her fetus during pregnancy or around the time of birth.
  • There have been reports of poor pregnancy outcomes and congenital microcephaly in babies of mothers who were infected with Zika virus while pregnant.

Is there a vaccine or medicine to treat Zika?

  • No. There is no vaccine to prevent infection. There is no medicine to treat Zika.

I am pregnant. Can I travel to a country where cases of Zika have been reported?

  • Until more is known, the CDC recommends that pregnant women in any trimester consider postponing travel to the areas where Zika virus transmission is ongoing.
  • Pregnant women who do travel to one of these areas should talk to their doctor or other healthcare provider first and strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites during the trip.
  • Women trying to become pregnant or who are thinking about becoming pregnant should consult with their healthcare provider before traveling to these areas and strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites during the trip.

What should I do if I have been in an area where Zika virus is transmitted?

  • Zika virus usually remains in the blood of an infected person for up to a week. 
  • The virus will not cause infections in an infant that is conceived after the virus is cleared from the blood.
  • There is currently no evidence that Zika virus infection poses a risk of birth defects in future pregnancies.

I am pregnant and I have been to an area of active transmission. What should I do?

  • Please alert your OB of any travel to an affected region during your pregnancy.
  • If you have two or more symptoms consistent with Zika virus infection within 2 weeks of travel, a blood test can be performed to determine if you have recently been infected with the virus.
  • If you do not have symptoms, detailed ultrasounds will be performed to look for any abnormalities associated with Zika virus.

Locations of active Zika virus transmission

zika-active-transmission

CDC has issued a travel notice (Level 2-Practice Enhanced Precautions) for people traveling to regions and certain countries where Zika virus transmission is ongoing.

Americas

  • Barbados
  • Bolivia
  • Brazil
  • Colombia
  • Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, US territory
  • Costa Rica
  • Curacao
  • Dominican Republic
  • Ecuador
  • El Salvador
  • French Guiana
  • Guadeloupe
  • Guatemala
  • Guyana
  • Haiti
  • Honduras
  • Martinique
  • Mexico
  • Nicaragua
  • Panama
  • Paraguay
  • Saint Martin
  • Suriname
  • U.S. Virgin Islands
  • Venezuela

Oceania/Pacific Islands

  • American Samoa
  • Samoa

Africa

  • Cape Verde

Petersen EE, Staples JE, Meaney-Delman, D, et al. Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During a Zika Virus Outbreak — United States, 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:30–33. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6502e1.