Dear Friends and Patients, As the COVID-19 scenario unfolds, we at WHSNT are putting extraordinary precautions in place to protect our patients. We continue to take all recommended CDC sterilization and disinfecting guidelines, as we always do. In light of the recent COVID-19 outbreak, we are also taking additional measures to ensure your health and safety. We have sinks and soap in every exam room and multiple hand sanitizer stations throughout the office for your use. We are asking that everyone come to your appointment alone, if at all possible. We understand some people need a driver or may be forced to bring a child given the school closures, but in order to minimize risk of exposure, we are asking that you please come to your visit alone. We also ask that you arrive on time to your appointment, rather than early, to avoid patients congregating in the waiting room. We will make every attempt to immediately escort you to your own exam room that has just been disinfected by our team. We are screening our patients on arrival for fever, chills, cough, congestion, breathing issues, and recent travel. If you are feeling the least bit under the weather, please call us to reschedule your appointment for a later date. Your health and safety are our top priority and minimizing the number of people you are in contact with is your best protection now. We take pride in our excellent sanitation practices, and will continue to go the extra mile as we navigate this together. We at WHSNT are essential workers and will continue to provide care during this time. We are putting every precaution in place to protect ourselves so we can continue to serve our patients and our community. This issue is rapidly evolving and we will keep you updated as we learn more. WHSNT supports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) patient care guidance issued on March 17 and the efforts of state and local authorities to combat the COVID-19 outbreak. Also, of critical importance are immediate efforts to assure access to essential health care, including urgent and emergent care provided by OB/GYNs, which can alleviate burdens on primary care clinics and emergency departments. Beginning Wednesday, 3/25/2020, the following change will be put in place in order to minimize the exposure of both the patients and staff while still providing the community with essential OB/GYN care. We will only see Gynecology patients with an urgent, emergent, or time sensitive problem and OB patients. All routine wellness/preventative visits will be cancelled. If you have medications that need to be refilled, or a problem that needs to be addressed sooner, please contact our office. We have Telehealth visits available and are seeing patients in the office that need care that cannot be provided remotely. As soon as the CDC announces it safe for routine office visits to resume, we will contact you to arrange WWE/preventative visit. With prayers for good health, WHSNT Management
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Coronavirus Disease 2019

Posted on Wednesday, March 25th, 2020 at 5:01 am    

Pregnant Women

What is the risk to pregnant women of getting COVID-19? Is it easier for pregnant women to become ill with the disease? If they become infected, will they be more sick than other people?

We do not currently know if pregnant women have a greater chance of getting sick from COVID-19 than the general public nor whether they are more likely to have serious illness as a result. Pregnant women experience changes in their bodies that may increase their risk of some infections. With viruses from the same family as COVID-19, and other viral respiratory infections, such as influenza, women have had a higher risk of developing severe illness. It is always important for pregnant women to protect themselves from illnesses.

How can pregnant women protect themselves from getting COVID-19?

Pregnant women should do the same things as the general public to avoid infection. You can help stop the spread of COVID-19 by taking these actions:

  • Cover your cough (using your elbow is a good technique)
  • Avoid people who are sick
  • Clean your hands often using soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer

You can find additional information on preventing COVID-19 disease at CDC’s (Prevention for 2019 Novel Coronavirus).

Can COVID-19 cause problems for a pregnancy?

We do not know at this time if COVID-19 would cause problems during pregnancy or affect the health of the baby after birth.

During Pregnancy or Delivery

Can COVID-19 be passed from a pregnant woman to the fetus or newborn?

We still do not know if a pregnant woman with COVID-19 can pass the virus that causes COVID-19 to her fetus or baby during pregnancy or delivery. No infants born to mothers with COVID-19 have tested positive for the COVID-19 virus. In these cases, which are a small number, the virus was not found in samples of amniotic fluid or breastmilk.

Infants

If a pregnant woman has COVID-19 during pregnancy, will it hurt the baby?

We do not know at this time what if any risk is posed to infants of a pregnant woman who has COVID-19. There have been a small number of reported problems with pregnancy or delivery (e.g. preterm birth) in babies born to mothers who tested positive for COVID-19 during their pregnancy. However, it is not clear that these outcomes were related to maternal infection.

Breastfeeding

Interim Guidance on Breastfeeding for a Mother Confirmed or Under Investigation For COVID-19

This interim guidance is intended for women who are confirmed to have COVID-19 or are persons-under-investigation (PUI) for COVID-19 and are currently breastfeeding. This interim guidance is based on what is currently known about COVID-19 and the transmission of other viral respiratory infections. CDC will update this interim guidance as needed as additional information becomes available. For breastfeeding guidance in the immediate postpartum setting, refer to Interim Considerations for Infection Prevention and Control of 2019 Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Inpatient Obstetric Healthcare Settings.

Transmission of COVID-19 through breast milk

Much is unknown about how COVID-19 is spread. Person-to-person spread is thought to occur mainly via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, similar to how influenza (flu) and other respiratory pathogens spread. In limited studies on women with COVID-19 and another coronavirus infection, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV), the virus has not been detected in breast milk; however we do not know whether mothers with COVID-19 can transmit the virus via breast milk.

CDC breastfeeding guidance for other infectious illnesses

Breast milk provides protection against many illnesses. There are rare exceptions when breastfeeding or  feeding expressed breast milk is not recommended. CDC has no specific guidance for breastfeeding during infection with similar viruses like SARS-CoV or Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV).

Outside of the immediate postpartum setting, CDC recommends that a mother with flu continue breastfeeding or feeding expressed breast milk to her infant while taking precautions to avoid spreading the virus to her infant.

Guidance on breastfeeding for mothers with confirmed COVID-19 or under investigation for COVID-19

Breast milk is the best source of nutrition for most infants. However, much is unknown about COVID-19. Whether and how to start or continue breastfeeding should be determined by the mother in coordination with her family and healthcare providers.  A mother with confirmed COVID-19 or who is a symptomatic PUI should take all possible precautions to avoid spreading the virus to her infant, including washing her hands before touching the infant and wearing a face mask, if possible, while feeding at the breast.  If expressing breast milk with a manual or electric breast pump, the mother should wash her hands before touching any pump or bottle parts and follow recommendations for proper pump cleaning after each use. If possible, consider having someone who is well feed the expressed breast milk to the infant.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/pregnancy-breastfeeding.html

Dr. Robin P. Kindred

Dr. Robin P. Kindred

Dr. Kindred is passionate about women's health and is an advocate for her patients. She believes that women should be educated and empowered to make the best healthcare decisions for themselves and their families. She sees patients exclusively at our Mansfield office.

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