Dear Friends and Patients, As the COVID-19 scenario unfolds, we at WHSNT are putting extraordinary precautions in place to protect our patients. We continue to take all recommended CDC sterilization and disinfecting guidelines, as we always do. In light of the recent COVID-19 outbreak, we are also taking additional measures to ensure your health and safety. We have sinks and soap in every exam room and multiple hand sanitizer stations throughout the office for your use. We are asking that everyone come to your appointment alone, if at all possible. We understand some people need a driver or may be forced to bring a child given the school closures, but in order to minimize risk of exposure, we are asking that you please come to your visit alone. We also ask that you arrive on time to your appointment, rather than early, to avoid patients congregating in the waiting room. We will make every attempt to immediately escort you to your own exam room that has just been disinfected by our team. We are screening our patients on arrival for fever, chills, cough, congestion, breathing issues, and recent travel. If you are feeling the least bit under the weather, please call us to reschedule your appointment for a later date. Your health and safety are our top priority and minimizing the number of people you are in contact with is your best protection now. We take pride in our excellent sanitation practices, and will continue to go the extra mile as we navigate this together. We at WHSNT are essential workers and will continue to provide care during this time. We are putting every precaution in place to protect ourselves so we can continue to serve our patients and our community. This issue is rapidly evolving and we will keep you updated as we learn more. WHSNT supports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) patient care guidance issued on March 17 and the efforts of state and local authorities to combat the COVID-19 outbreak. Also, of critical importance are immediate efforts to assure access to essential health care, including urgent and emergent care provided by OB/GYNs, which can alleviate burdens on primary care clinics and emergency departments. Beginning Wednesday, 3/25/2020, the following change will be put in place in order to minimize the exposure of both the patients and staff while still providing the community with essential OB/GYN care. We will only see Gynecology patients with an urgent, emergent, or time sensitive problem and OB patients. All routine wellness/preventative visits will be cancelled. If you have medications that need to be refilled, or a problem that needs to be addressed sooner, please contact our office. We have Telehealth visits available and are seeing patients in the office that need care that cannot be provided remotely. As soon as the CDC announces it safe for routine office visits to resume, we will contact you to arrange WWE/preventative visit. With prayers for good health, WHSNT Management
Home  >  Obstetrics  >  Prenatal Screening for Birth Defects

Prenatal Screening for Birth Defects

Posted on Tuesday, November 10th, 2015 at 4:05 pm    

A pregnant woman can undergo fetal screening for certain birth defects during her pregnancy. Birth defects may be caused by problems with genes, chromosomes, or exposure to certain agents. However, 70% of birth defects have no known cause.

Prenatal screening tests can show whether you are at high risk or low risk of having a baby with a particular disorder.

If the screening test shows that you are high risk for a birth defect, a diagnostic test will have to be done to determine if your baby actually has the disorder.

Here are some screening tests which can help determine your baby’s risk of having a birth defect.

Prenatal Screening Tests

Screening Test Test Type What Does It Screen For? Detection Rate
Combined first trimester screening (11-13 weeks gestational age) Blood test plus an ultrasound exam Trisomy 21
Trisomy 13
Trisomy 18
82–87%
Second trimester single screen for neural tube defects (14-16 wga) Blood test Neural tube defects 85%
Second trimester quad screen (15-20 wga) Blood test Trisomy 21
Trisomy 18
Neural tube defects
81%
Integrated screening Blood and an ultrasound exam in the first trimester, followed by quad screen in the second trimester Trisomy 21
Trisomy 18
Neural tube defects
94–96%
Panorama Screen also known as cell free fetal DNA test (>10 wga) Blood test that looks at fetal DNA in mother’s blood Trisomy 21
Trisomy 13
Trisomy 18
Neural tube defects
Sex chromosome abnormalities
Microdeletions
>99%

Glossary

Trisomy:
a condition in which there is an extra chromosome.
Monosomy:
a condition in which there is a missing chromosome.
Trisomy 13:
Patau syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by heart defects and other developmental problems. Most affected infants die within the first year of life.
Trisomy 18:
Edwards Syndrome is a genetic disorder that causes serious mental and developmental problems. Most affected infants die within the first year of life.
Trisomy 21:
Down Syndrome is a genetic disorder in which abnormal features of the face and body, medical problems such as heart defects, and intellectual disability occur.
Monosomy X:
Turner Syndrome is a condition affecting females in which there is a missing or damaged X chromosome. It causes a webbed neck, short height, and heart problems.
Neural Tube Defect:
Birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. The most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina bifida, the fetal spinal column doesn’t close completely. In anencephaly, most of the brain and skull do not develop.

Information adapted from ACOG Patient Information FAQ 165

Dr. Robin P. Kindred

Dr. Robin P. Kindred

Dr. Kindred is passionate about women's health and is an advocate for her patients. She believes that women should be educated and empowered to make the best healthcare decisions for themselves and their families. She sees patients exclusively at our Mansfield office.

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